Managing Apple Maggots with Insecticides

Managing Apple Maggots with Insecticides

There is probably no other pest as damaging to home fruit production as the apple maggot, a.k.a. railroad worm. The plant is native to this region of the world and is found throughout the state. The fruit infestation typically occurs during the summer when many families are taking vacations. Even a brief lack of attention can lead to substantial fruit damage.

Table of Contents

1. Biology of Apple Maggots
2. Devastation of Apple Maggots
3. Apple Maggot Prevention
4. Controlling Apple Maggots
5. Insecticide Chart

Biology of Apple Maggots

Apple maggot spends winter in the soil as a pupa. Adults emerge from the soil in late June or early July. Apple maggot flies continue to emerge from the soil throughout the summer and can be active until October. In the first seven to ten days following its emergence, the adult apple maggot feeds until it has reached sexual maturity. After mating females lay eggs just under the skin of the host fruit. A single female can lay between 300 and 500 eggs over her lifetime, which can last 30 or more days. Eggs hatch in 3 to 10 days depending on temperatures. The larvae (maggots) feed while tunneling through the fruit flesh. Typically larvae complete development in about 30 days. Temperatures and fruit hardness influence the rate of development and survivorship of larvae. Full-grown larvae leave the fruit and enter the soil to pupate. Most apple maggot pupae remain in the soil for one winter, though a few may remain there for two or more years. In warm years some flies can complete development and emerge as a partial second generation.

There are several factors that affect your ability to control these pests, such as how many apple maggots are present in an area and how many unmanaged apple trees surround your garden. You may have trouble keeping apple maggots under control if others in your area plant trees and don’t maintain them.

Devastation of Apple Maggots

Apple maggots are able to damage apples on two different levels. The first damage occurs when they lay eggs on the apples. The apple flesh stops growing at that site, which results in a weird, dimpled or sunken area on the apple—but it doesn’t stop there! When the maggots hatch, they tunnel through the flesh of the apple, causing it to decay and rot. Even so, a bit of prevention can help you defeat the destructive apple maggot.

There are several factors that affect your ability to control these pests, such as how many apple maggots are present in an area and how many unmanaged apple trees surround your garden. You may have trouble keeping apple maggots under control if others in your area plant trees and don’t maintain them.

Apple Maggot Prevention

Sanitation is the first issue to address. Pick up and dispose of apples within a few days after they’ve fallen. The best way to dispose of them is to trench compost them—just be sure that your trench or hole is at least a foot deep. If you still want to use these fallen apples, you can trim off the bad parts and turn the remainder into cider or applesauce.

Controlling Apple Maggots

Controlling apple maggots has been traditionally achieved with organophosphate insecticides, like Imidan. Synthetic pyrethroid compounds, like Asana, Warrior, Danitol, Battalion, Mustang Max and Baythroid, are also toxic to adult fruit flies but are generally viewed to be moderately effective because they have a shorter field residual.

  • Red Sphere Traps will greatly reduce damage and work well to capture and reduce the number of egg-laying adults. Traps should be placed within the canopy just as trees are finished blooming. Hang spheres high in the brightest areas of the tree, 6-7 feet from the ground. Set out one trap for every 150 apples (2 traps per dwarf tree).
  • Beneficial nematodes are microscopic, worm-like parasites that actively hunt, penetrate and destroy the pupal stage of this pest. For best results, apply in the early spring or fall around the base of trees, out to the drip line. One application will continue working for 18 months.
  • Surround WP — made from kaolin clay — will suppress a broad range of insects and has shown over 90% control of apple pests. It also has a positive effect on fungal diseases like fire blight, sooty blotch and flyspeck.
  • Apple maggot is listed on the labels of several reduced-risk and organophosphate-replacement insecticides:
    • The neonicotinoids Belay and Assail are labeled for apple maggot control. Despite their limited lethal action on adult apple maggots, they provide strong curative action on eggs and larvae.
    • Spinosyn compounds Delegate and Entrust are active against apple maggots when consumed, but have shown only fair control in field trials with high pest pressure, thus are marketed only to suppress apple maggots.
    • OMRI-approved Venerate is a biopesticide used to control apple maggots.
    • Pre-mix compounds such as Voliam Flexi, is labeled for apple maggot control.

Insecticide Chart

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Beneficial Insects That Help Your Crop Production

Beneficial Insects That Help Your Crop Production

When you think of bugs on your crops, you probably think about those pesky little insects that feast on your produce and crops. This is understandable since they can reduce yields, blemish produce, and transmit diseases. But, what about the other 95% of insects out there that don’t cause trouble? You might be surprised to find out how much they can actually help you!

Table of Content

Intro
Five Soil Health Principles
Creating Habitat for Insects
Most Insects Benefits Farmers

The conservation of beneficial insects on his farm is a critical part of Bryan Jorgensen’s management plan, an agronomist for his family’s operation, Jorgensen Land and Cattle near Ideal, South Dakota.

“Insects are a primary part of the biome; it wouldn’t function without insects,” he says. “Their activity contributes to the building of soil organic matter, for instance. Beneficial predatory insects eat pest insects. Some insects are pollinators. Others are herbivores that regulate weed populations by eating weed seeds.”

Farm profitability is enhanced by the cooperative efforts of beneficial insects, he says. The economic benefits spin from multiple services performed by helpful insects. Boosting yields is one benefit of insect pollination of flowering crops. Another benefit, insecticides and fungicides may be reduced by beneficial insects consuming pests.

An uncertain science is assessing the extent of beneficial insect populations in fields and whether they are growing. Jorgensen evaluates insect activity by examining the soil itself and its ability to absorb moisture.

“I watch how the soil reacts to water infiltration,” he says. “Insects create macropores and micropores in the soil, and these facilitate rapid water infiltration.”

While it’s not a way to measure existing insect populations, Jorgensen says leaving residue on the soil’s surface will help to build insect populations.

“If you have a healthy soil system — with residue on the surface — you’re going to have tons of insects, and if you look beneath the residue, you’ll see them,” he says.

Jorgensen remembers a time when his family’s farming system was an unhealthy one. “I started farming in the mid-1980s, and at the time we used lots of tillage,” he says. “We had summer fallow, and we kept it tilled black. There was little opportunity for insects to thrive, and certainly the tillage prevented any chance for insects to build micropores and macropores in the soil.”

Five Soil Health Principles

With time, the Jorgensen’s developed their present farming system, which incorporates no-till, diverse crop rotations, and livestock grazing.

“We practice the five principles of soil health, which are all important to maintaining a healthy soil system, including a healthy population of insects,” says Jorgensen. “We keep the soil surface covered with residue. We disturb the soil as little as possible, and we try to keep living roots in the soil for as long as possible. Living roots create a host environment for a living biology.

“We also try to mimic nature by growing a diverse population of crops, and we integrate livestock grazing into the system,” he says. “Through their manure and urine, grazing cattle, sheep, or goats spread nutrients from the crop residues back onto the soil surface. The insects then move these nutrients back into the soil system.”

The diverse crops the Jorgensen’s grow include winter wheat, corn, grain sorghum, soybeans, oats, spring wheat, field peas, alfalfa, forage sorghums, and tame grasses.

“On some of our poorer ground we establish tame grasses for 10 to 15 years to build soil health,” says Jorgensen. They feed their livestock most of the crops they grow.

They grow a multi-species cover crop behind winter wheat. “We harvest the wheat in mid-July, and behind that we plant a cover crop mix including eight to 12 species of both warm-season and cool-season plants,” he says. “We graze cattle on the cover crops in November, December, and January.”

By grazing cover crops and mechanically harvesting crops, they monitor the amount of residue being removed from fields. “We have to replace that residue with some other kind of residue or nutrient, otherwise the system will go backward and organic matter will decline,” says Jorgensen.

Since soybeans leave little residue after harvest, the Jorgensen farm typically plants winter wheat, a crop with high residue, after soybeans, if the weather allows.

“If we don’t plant winter wheat behind the soybeans, we’ll plant oats or spring wheat on that field in the spring,” he says.

They have found that grazing cattle on cover crops is the most effective way to maintain surface residue and build soil organic matter. “Across the farm in 2021, the average organic matter content of our soil was 4.3%,” he says. “Some fields tested as high as 8.5%. Those were fields that had a history of very little removal of crop residue and a lot of cattle activity,” he says.

The organic matter in their soil was typically around 1% before they adopted regenerative management.

Creating Habitat for Insects

As an insect researcher, Jonathan Lundgren has dedicated his life to exploring the role of insects in agricultural production systems. After working as a research entomologist for the USDA-Agricultural Research Service, he founded Blue Dasher Farm, Estelline, South Dakota, as a research and demonstration farm in regenerative agriculture.

“There are hundreds of species of insects, and many of them are extremely important in reducing a farmer’s dependence on insecticides,” he says. “Lady beetles, lacewings, ants — those are just a few common examples of beneficial insects.

”Research data suggests that diversity of insect populations on farms correlates with profitability, says Lundgren. “We know that farms that have more insect life have fewer pests and don’t have to spend much money on inputs; thus, they tend to be profitable,” he says.

Insect populations are best built by eliminating tillage and agrochemicals, and by increasing farm biological diversity. “Grow lots and lots of plants,” he advises farmers. “Never leave soil bare, and get animals out on the landscape to regulate those plants.

According to Lundgren’s research, farmers who adopt such regenerative practices can benefit as early as one year from the services of beneficial insects that prey on crop pests. One study shows that predation on pest caterpillars doubled in the first year of the transition and nearly tripled in the second year.

Pesticides and fungicides damage beneficial insect populations, but even herbicides can harm them. “Herbicides can harm some insects,” says Lundgren. “But as a rule, herbicides are less harmful to insects than tillage.

”To compensate for the damage done to insect populations by the application of herbicides to crops, he suggests continued seeding of diverse plants in the field to keep living roots in the ground. “You might also leave strips in the field that are unsprayed, to create ‘islands’ where the insects can live.

”The most important way to ensure the diversity of life on a farm — including insects — is to become intimately familiar with your soil and plants and the life that attends them.

“Every day, walk out into a field and see something — some form of life — that you’ve never seen before,” says Lundgren. “If you can do that, you’re on the right path to building biological diversity on your farm.”

Most Insects Benefits Farmers

Beneficial insects have increased in numbers as a result of regenerative management practices. These insects help maintain healthy crops and soil systems. Jorgensen does everything he can to protect their well-being.

“I don’t use any insecticides, with the exception of controlling alfalfa weevils every five or six years,” he says. “I also use no fungicides. In a healthy system, plants can typically defend themselves against viral infections.

“Unfortunately, many of us have been taught that insects are bad, and we have to spray them,” says Jorgensen. “In truth, most insects are beneficial. It’s only a handful that cause problems. Healthy soil and cropping systems need insects to thrive.”

More about Soil Health

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Emergency Relief

Emergency Relief

As a means of helping agricultural producers cope with natural disasters in 2020 and 2021, Congress included emergency relief funding in the Extending Government Funding and Delivering Emergency Assistance Act (P.L. 117-43). A minimum of 750 million dollars will be allocated to livestock producers impacted by droughts and wildfires.

In the past two years, the USDA has worked diligently to develop programs, policies, and provisions that will equitably distribute these much-needed payments to producers hard-hit by catastrophes. As program details become available, USDA will keep producers and stakeholders informed through proactive communication and outreach.

There will be two phases of distribution: Emergency Livestock Relief Program (ELRP) and Emergency Relief Program (ERP).

Emergency Livestock Relief Program (ELRP) – Phase 1

In the first phase of the ELRP program, producers will be compensated for the cost of supplemental feed as a result of forage losses in calendar year 2021 due to droughts or wildfires, using the data already submitted to FSA through the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP).

ELRP Phase 1 only includes 2021 LFP participants.

Livestock producers who have losses due to drought are eligible for assistance if:

  • Any area within the county in which the loss occurred was rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as having a D2 (severe drought) for eight consecutive weeks, or a D3 (extreme drought) or higher level of drought intensity during the applicable year.
  • Producers whose permitted grazing on federally managed lands was disallowed due to wildfire are also eligible for ELRP payments.

All grazing animals that meet their majority of nutritional needs by grazing forage grasses or legumes are eligible, including alpacas, beef cattle, buffalo/ bison, beefalo, dairy cattle, deer, elk, emus, equine, goats, llamas, reindeer, and sheep.

How to Apply

For ELRP Phase 1, eligible livestock producers are not required to submit an application for ELRP phase 1; however, they must have the following forms on file determined by FSA’s Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs:

  • CCC-853, Livestock Forage Disaster Program Application
  • Form AD-2047, Customer Data Worksheet;
  • Form CCC-902, Farm Operating Plan for an individual or legal entity as provided in 7 CFR part 1400;
  • Form CCC-901, Member Information for Legal Entities (if applicable); and
  • Form AD-1026 Highly Erodible Land Conservation (HELC) and Wetland Conservation (WC)
  • Certification for the ELRP producer and applicable affiliates.

Payments

Payments under Phase 1 of the ELRP will be calculated by multiplying an eligible livestock producer’s gross LFP payment for 2021 by the applicable ELRP payment factor.

The ELRP payment factor will be 90 percent for beginning, limited resource, socially disadvantaged, and veteran farmers and ranchers, and 75 percent for all other producers.

Form CCC-860, Socially Disadvantaged, Limited Resource, Beginning and Veteran Farmer or Rancher Certification, must be on file with FSA with a certification applicable for the 2021 program year to receive a payment based on the higher payment factor.
Payment Limitation and Adjusted Gross Income

Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) limitations do not apply to ELRP, however the payment limitation for ELRP is determined by the person’s or legal entity’s average adjusted gross farm income (income derived from farming, ranching, and forestry operations). Specifically, a person or legal entity, other than a joint venture or general partnership, cannot receive, directly or indirectly, more than $125,000 in payments under ELRP if their average adjusted gross farm income is less than 75 percent of their average AGI for tax years 2017, 2018, and 2019.

If at least 75 percent of the person or legal entity’s average AGI is derived from farming, ranching, or forestry related activities and the participant provides the required certification and documentation, as discussed below, the person or legal entity, other than a joint venture or general partnership, is eligible to receive, directly or indirectly, up to $250,000 in ELRP payments. To request the increased payment limitation, participants must file form FSA-510 complete with participant’s certification their average adjusted gross farm income is at least 75 percent of their average AGI and a certification from a Licensed Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or Attorney that the participant meets the requirements.

Attribution of payments apply to ELRP and payments to a legal entity are tracked through four levels of ownership, attributed, and limited to persons or legal entities that hold an ownership interest in the legal entity. For more information, see the Direct Attribution information on the Payment Limitations webpage.

Emergency Livestock Relief Program (ELRP) – Phase 2

In order to ensure that much-needed emergency relief program benefits are distributed evenly and equally, the FSA will continue evaluating and identifying the impacts of 2021 drought and wildfire on livestock producers.

All ELRP information and resources will be updated as Phase 2 policies and provisions are available.

Emergency Relief Program (ERP) – Phase 1

The first phase of ERP assistance will provide payments to producers who were impacted by wildfires, droughts, hurricanes, winter storms, and other eligible disasters experienced during the calendar years 2020 and 2021 using the existing Federal Crop Insurance or Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) data already submitted to FSA.

Fact Sheet

Who is Eligible?

For ERP eligibility, “related conditions” are damaging weather and adverse natural occurrences that occurred concurrently with and as a direct result of a specified qualifying disaster event. They include:

As part of ERP eligibility, “related conditions” are weather events and adverse natural occurrences that occurred concurrently with or directly resulting from a qualifying disaster event. They include:

  • Excessive wind that occurred as a direct result of a derecho;
  • Silt and debris that occurred as a direct result of flooding;
  • Excessive wind, storm surges, tornados, tropical storms, and tropical depressions that occurred as a direct result of a hurricane; and
  • Excessive wind and blizzards that occurred as a direct result of a winter storm.

For drought, ERP assistance is available if any area within the county in which the loss occurred was rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as having a D2 (severe drought) for eight consecutive weeks or D3 (extreme drought) or a higher level of drought intensity.

2020 drought counties eligible for ERP
2021 drought counties eligible for ERP

How to Apply

For ERP Phase 1, FSA will send pre-filled application forms to producers whose crop insurance and NAP data are already on file because they received a crop insurance indemnity or NAP payment. This form includes eligibility requirements, outlines the application process, and provides ERP payment information. Producers will receive a separate application form for each program year. Receipt of a pre-filled application is not confirmation that a producer is eligible to receive an ERP Phase 1 payment.

Producers must also have the following forms on file determined by FSA’s Deputy Administrator for Farm Programs:

  • Form AD-2047, Customer Data Worksheet;
  • Form CCC-902, Farm Operating Plan for an individual or legal entity;
  • Form CCC-901, Member Information for Legal Entities (if applicable); and
  • Form AD-1026 Highly Erodible Land Conservation (HELC) and Wetland Conservation (WC)
  • Certification for the ELRP producer and applicable affiliates

Most producers, especially those who have previously participated in FSA programs will likely have these required forms on file. However, those who are uncertain or want to confirm should contact their local FSA county office.

In addition to the forms listed above, certain producers will also need to submit the following forms to qualify for an increased payment rate or payment limitation.

  • Form CCC-860, Socially Disadvantaged, Limited Resource, Beginning and Veteran Farmer or Rancher Certification, if applicable, for the 2021 program year.
  • Form FSA-510, Request for an Exception to the $125,000 Payment Limitation for Certain Programs (if applicable).

In addition to the forms listed above, certain producers will also need to submit the following forms to qualify for an increased payment rate or payment limitation.

  • Form CCC-860, Socially Disadvantaged, Limited Resource, Beginning and Veteran Farmer or Rancher Certification, if applicable, for the 2021 program year.
  • Form FSA-510, Request for an Exception to the $125,000 Payment Limitation for Certain Programs (if applicable).

Payments

For crops covered by crop insurance, the ERP Phase 1 payment calculation for a crop and unit will depend on the type and level of coverage obtained by the producer. Based on the producer’s level of crop insurance or NAP coverage, each calculation uses the following ERP factor.

Crop Insurance – the ERP factor is 75% to 95% depending on the level of coverage ranging from catastrophic to at least 80% coverage.
NAP – the ERP factor is 75% to 95% depending on the level of coverage ranging from catastrophic to 65% coverage. FSA will perform a conventional NAP payment calculation with an adjusted guarantee equal to the ERP Factor.

ERP factors tables can be found on the ERP Fact Sheet.

FSA will mail application forms for policyholders with 2021 crop year coverage under Stacked Income Protection (STAX), Supplemental Coverage Option (SCO), Enhanced Coverage Option (ECO), Margin Protection (MP), and Area Risk Protection Insurance (ARPI) when data becomes available.

Payment Limitation and Adjusted Gross Income

The payment limitation for ERP Phase 1 is determined by the person’s or legal entity’s average adjusted gross farm income (income from activities related to farming, ranching, or forestry).

Specifically, a person or legal entity, other than a joint venture or general partnership, cannot receive, directly or indirectly, more than $125,000 in payments for specialty and high-value crops and $125,000 in payment for all other crops under ERP (for Phase 1 and Phase 2 combined) for a program year if their average adjusted gross (AGI) farm income is less than 75 percent of their average AGI the three taxable years preceding the most immediately preceding complete tax year.

If at least 75 percent of the person or legal entity’s average AGI is derived from farming, ranching, or forestry-related activities and the participant provides the required certification and documentation, as discussed below, the person or legal entity, other than a joint venture or general partnership, is eligible to receive, directly or indirectly, up to:

  • $900,000 for each program year for specialty crops; and
  • $250,000 for each program year for all other crops.

The relevant tax years for establishing a producer’s AGI and percentage derived from farming, ranching, and forestry-related activities are:

  • 2016, 2017, and 2018 for program year 2020;
  • 2017, 2018, and 2019 for program year 2021; and
  • 2018, 2019, and 2020 for program year 2022.

To request the increased payment limitation, participants must file form FSA-510 complete with the participant’s certification their average adjusted gross farm income is at least 75 percent of their average AGI and certification from a licensed Certified Public Accountant (CPA) or Attorney that the participant meets the requirements. To learn more, visit the Payment Eligibility and Payment Limitations fact sheet.

The Requirement to Purchase Crop Insurance or NAP Coverage

Producers who receive ERP Phase 1 payments must purchase crop insurance, or NAP coverage if crop insurance is not available, in the next two crop years to be determined by the Secretary. Purchased coverage must be at 60/100 level of coverage or higher for insured crops, or at the catastrophic coverage level or higher for NAP crops.

 

Emergency Relief Program (ERP) – Phase 2

Updates will be made once program details are finalized.

All ELRP information and resources will be updated as Phase 2 policies and provisions are available.

La Niña is Back! Could Disrupt Already Heated Market

La Niña is Back! Could Disrupt Already Heated Market

La Niñas weather event which came in October 2020 has returned for a second cycle. By 2021 Pacific Ocean waters along with the central and east-central equatorial band had returned to remarkably below normal temperatures. In simple words, temperatures in most of the Americas pacific region were below normal. Meanwhile, Atlantic Sea surface temperatures were above normal.

Table of Contents

1. Intro Paragraph
2. Effects on Markets
3. La Niña Biggest Impact

La Niñas weather events are generally related to cooler and wetter winters in the Northern Regions of America and Canada, along with the warmer and dryer weather conditions in the southern part of the U.S. This weather event can also disturb the weather conditions in South America, correlating with droughts in many areas of the continent and wetter than normal weather in other regions. Uruguay, Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay have been affected by record-high temperatures in December when their summer seasons began.

Effects on Markets

The last two La Niña’s have different effects on the market. At the beginning of the August 2010 La Niña, spot prices for corn and soy rose significantly. On the other hand, wheat prices fell slightly. In the 12 months after the beginning of October 2020 La Niña, corn, wheat, and soybean prices rose.

The most recent events of La Niña came when commodity prices are rising swiftly, despite Federal revenue and other major central banks amid periods of quantitative easing. During the period of Arab spring in 2010 and early 2011, oil prices rose significantly and caused major disruption in the supply chain. From October 2020, crude oil and commodity prices start rising once again due to the COVID pandemic and global supply chain disruption. Oil and agriculture markets suffer a lot due to co-movement in the prices, as in some countries, corn and wheat is being used in making biofuels.

In addition to these macroeconomics factors, another reason for increasing crop prices during the events of La Niña might be correlated with increased production of soybean and corn in South American regions. In 2000, the US suppressed South American countries like Argentina and Brazil in terms of corn and soybean production. However, now these South American countries suppress the US exports in terms of net Corn exports.

La Niña’s Biggest Impact

La Niña’s worst impact on the North American region tends to come in during the winter seasons. The good news is that it is far away from crucial crop growing and harvesting seasons. To the Extent, La Niña affects North American summers, it seems to be related to relatively good growing conditions.

On the other hand, La Niña tends to thump South American regions during their summer season and is capable of doing more damage to crops. This may be the core reason for higher crop prices during the last two episodes of La Niña. As we know, the South American region leads in terms of corn and soybean exports, what happens there is very critical to Global Agri Markets.

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Easy Crop Insurance Mistakes That Keep You from Getting Your Payout

Easy Crop Insurance Mistakes That Keep You from Getting Your Payout

Crop insurance is federally funded and it is crucial to adhere to the deadlines and requirements of your crop insurance policy, in order to receive your claim dollars when they are due. These are the top mistakes we see.

Table of Contents

1. Documents do not have a signature or a date
2. Important Deadlines were missed
3. Application Time
4. Acreage Report
5. Production Report
6. Claims

Documents do not have a signature or a date

It is vital that all crop insurance documents are signed and dated promptly. Signatures on FSA paperwork are not valid.

Important Deadlines were missed

Your insurance could be canceled if you miss important dates. With most companies you can sign up for emails or text service to receive reminders about important dates and what you need. See more important deadlines here

Application Time

Changes in the entity – all insurance companies need to know when your farming operation has changed. Crop insurance is tied to the entity that sells your grains. This is the entity you should certify your acres with at FSA. However, this is not an absolute requirement. Some people overlook other changes such as marriage, divorce, and death.

If your crop rotation has changed.

Changing your rotation could have an impact on your premium. Although you don’t need to tell us exactly where your crop is until the acreage reporting deadline, it’s a good idea for your agent to discuss your plans for the year.

Acreage Report

If the FSA documentation is missing, a claims adjuster will first look at your FSA certification to verify the information necessary to pay claims. It helps if the information matches. FSA should send you your report, or you can include it with your acreage report. It is a common way to verify errors.

Your schedule is ready for you to review – Once you have completed your acreage report, you will receive a schedule with insurance. Double-check this document as soon as you can, this is another way to find errors.

Don’t wait too long to correct errors. It is possible for your indemnity to be denied if an error in acreage reporting is not detected until the claim time, or later, depending on the circumstances.

You may not have reported all your acres. Crop insurance requires you to report all your crop acres that are insured on your acreage report. This includes uninsurable, late-planted, prevent-plant, double-crop, and other areas. Learn more about crop acreage reporting here.

Production Report

Don’t wait too long to submit your production. Knowing the final production will help you determine if you have a claim. In case of a claim, it is crucial to give your figures to your agent soon after harvest. 

Commingling production – It is recommended that you keep track and report your production the same way as your acres. You can commingle production if you have qualified for enterprise units. You could face penalty yields in your historical databases if you don’t indicate commingled output. You can’t combine the farms of optional units. If you do, penalty yields will be assessed. You must keep a log of the way your bushels were separated for each farm when you place your crop in a storage container.

You have forgotten to include the production type in your form. The production type is what indicates how you established your production for the year (ie. If it was sold, fed or combined monitor records.

Claims

Not telling your agent about crop problems is a mistake. Claims can be submitted online, by email, phone, text or written notice. Insurance money can be denied for delayed claims or notices. Learn more about how to file a claim here

Yield claims must be submitted generally no later than 15 working days after the end date of the insurance period. This could be either when the crop has been harvested or December 10, whichever comes first.

The claims process with an adjuster should be started within 60 days of the end of the insurance period. Failure to do this will result in a delayed claim. After the final price is established, revenue claims must be submitted within 45 days.

Waiting until Harvest is Complete – Claims must be submitted by crop/by county and by unit. Waiting until your entire harvest is in can cause you to miss a claim deadline for one of your units or crops. If you have a low yielding farm, it is better to call your insurance company right away to discuss options. It is much easier to withdraw a claim than to submit a late claim. It is not a crime to withdraw a claim after you have submitted it. 

You must initiate the claim process – Agents cannot submit claims without your permission. The policyholder must initiate claims.

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